Recent articles

My wife and I, kissing

Awareness and Understanding — A Magical Combination

Okay, so ... the article after my last, Why Neurodiversity Matters at Work, was supposed to be about workplace accommodations for the neurodiverse. That one's coming, still in the works. But there was a moment today, a moment that perfectly illustrates how awareness and understanding are, by themselves, 90% of the battle for accommodations. When there is enlightened awareness in combination with compassion and understanding, the accommodations will come. This afternoon I was doing my physiotherapy (recovering from a titanium rod having been put in my left tibia, after a motorcycle accident in which the bike was totaled, making ...
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Nikola Tesla and a productivity graph

Why Neurodiversity Matters At Work

If T.S. Eliot was right, and the world will end not with a bang but a whimper, at least we can safely say that the end of 2016 is not, fortunately, the end of the world — for not many would suggest that the transition from 2016 to 2017 will be anything like a whimper. Those of us for whom diversity and inclusion are important might be feeling a bit grim about the change in political climate as we enter the new year. But that's giving up too easily. Instead, now is the time to work even harder toward our ...
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/ Neurodiversity in the workplace

A Tale of Two Approaches to Neurodiversity Inclusion

Recently, I finished reading Janine Booth's Autism Equality in the Workplace (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, London and Philadelphia, 2016): what an inspiration! The content is clearly laid out, with a survey of the barriers to successful inclusion of autistic people in the workplace, and solid recommendations to remove those barriers. Throughout the book, Booth has included the perspectives and experiences of numerous autistic people she has interviewed. These things alone make the book a compelling and invaluable resource. What impressed me most of all, however, were two insightful distinctions that inform much of Booth's approach. First is the revealing contrast between ...
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/ Neurodiversity in the workplace

On The Road Again

I don't like cars. Nope, never really have. If I never had to get into the driver's seat again I'd be delighted. But, for most of us, it's unavoidable right? I mean, let's face it: either you commute to work, run errands during the day or somehow need your car (or, in our case, minivan). Heck, some of us may even drive for a living. There are exceptions, of course. when I lived in New York City I didn't drive (I didn't even own a car) but since moving south driving has become unavoidable. For the first few years in ...
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/ Coping